The continued design journey

While the current newsletter design works functionality, it leaves much to be desired when looking at the design hierarchy of needs. Considering this the design chosen lacks the means to grab and hold an educators attention, and would most likely be thrown into the “I will read it later” (read never) pile. To overcome this, the design must evolve into something that remains simple and functional at its core while creative enough to grab and hold the viewers’ attention. Below is an example of what educators recieve all the time.

CCR+Fall+2014+Newsletter-thumbnail(Child Care Resources, Inc., 2015)

Using design principles such as, entry point, legibility, accessibility (Lidwell, W., Holden, K., & Butler, J., 2010) to name a few to appeal directly to what educators focus on when they are creating their own learning resources will be the key to the designs success. With this in mind, a design that will grab the viewers’ attention and then requires them to interact with the design will have a much greater chance of holding their attention.

 

Using the design principle of entry point as a start, changed the perceived design form a plain a4 sheet to a to an A5 sheet that folded out from the centre. This design would draw the viewer into the image and use our natural inquisitiveness to create an interaction. Once the viewer is interacting with the design it is easier to hold their attention.

As this design is aimed at educators a clear focus on legibility needs to be present as this will be subconsciously focused on and judged as to its worth as a resource even before one word is read. To achieve this font, sizing and colour are key elements to consider (Ambrose, G., & Harris, P., 2009).

design 2

Reference:

Ambrose, G., & Harris, P. (2009). The fundamentals of graphic design. AvA publishing.

Child Care Resources, Inc., (2015). Newsletter. [online] Available at: http://www.childcareresourcesinc.com/newsletter/ [Accessed 14 Nov. 2015].

Lidwell, W., Holden, K., & Butler, J. (2010). Universal Principles of Design: 125 Ways to Enhance Usability, Influence Perception, Increase Appeal, Make Better Design Decisions, and Teach Through Design. Beverly, MA.: Rockport Publishers.